Facilitator ExpressInvesting in People, Productivity, Growth.

We're So Sorry.....

Posted by Donna Tate on 4/1/2019 to Training Research
Uncle AlbertLeroy Jethro Gibbs was famous for quoting Rule Number 6, "Never say you're sorry, it's a sign of weakness."  On the surface, one can hear the ring of truth in that rule.  For it has happened, hasn't it?  We have apologized for something and we knew immediately, as soon as the words escape, it was a mistake.  At that moment we knew we had put ourselves at a social disadvantage.  If we were very fortunate the other person might have said, "No, no, no!  Not at all, don't worry about it.!"  Unfortunately, and especially in a tough busineess setting, a super competitive workplace, a very public leadership opportunity, the reply is often, awkward silence. 




Are You Positive About That?

Posted by Donna Tate of Facilitator Express on 7/6/2017 to Facilitator Recommendations
ProductivityIf a study has proven how CEO’s can become 15 percent more productive, or how managers can improve customer satisfaction by 42 percent, then I think the people in the trenches ought to know about it…  In his book, The Happiness Advantage, Shawn Anchor goes on to explain how people can use the principles of positive psychology to gain a competitive edge in their career and in the workplace.

Emotional Culture

Posted by Donna Tate on 1/10/2016 to Facilitator Recommendations

Emotional Culture ResearchIt has been a long-held belief that cross cultural differences play a direct role in personality traits.

Are there more “D’s” for instance, in U.S. cultures, more S’s in Asian cultures, more “I’s” in the Hispanic Cultures, etc.?  The popular DISC instrument is used in name here, but it could be any number of other personality / behavioral trait measuring assessments.  New research however, has offered new data that suggests we look again.  Cultural differences do play a role in personality traits, therefore, must be considered in any reliable personality assessment construct / training choice. 

Sparks of Genius

Posted by Donna Tate on 8/27/2015 to Training Research

Sparks of GeniusUnlock the Genius:

An oldie (1999) but still quite good and relevant to today's facilitator and corporate trainer.  Especially relevant is chapter 13, simply entitled "Playing".  As a "thinking tool", they have saved the best for last - nothing like play, or experiential games and activities to kick-start creativity.  Play naturally feeds emotional intelligence and learning, for a mind sailing on the endorphins of fun cannot help but learn things more quickly, and see solutions previously locked out.  Some offer advice for mental block, and say, "Walk away!"  "Go to the park.",  "Take a drive."  All good remedies and "thinking tools".  None of them,,, holding a candle.... to play.  Read on....